Reflecting on How Programming Has Changed

My birthday was a few weeks ago. That got me nostalgic and I started thinking about how much has changed since I started programming nearly 25 years ago at Arthur Andersen. I also realized that many things really haven’t changed. And that, unfortunately, we do seem to have to learn the same lesson.

The Internet

Easily, the biggest change is the existence of the Internet. There isn’t an aspect of programming the Internet hasn’t helped. In thinking back, one of the biggest impacts I think it’s had is making documentation and assistance easily and readily available. In my first decade or so of development, if you had questions, the only sources tended to be finding the manufacturer manuals (yes, I have read many IBM COBOL manual) and, if you were lucky (or maybe not so lucky), the corporate “expert”. Now, documentation is readily available on-line and there is tons of help.

REST Programming Architecture

Designing programs using a REST architecture has started to become very common for good reason. However, when I look back, I don’t think REST is a big change. Instead I think it has made incremental improvements over what was learned programming mainframes 40 years ago.

I started as a COBOL, CICS programmer. CICS used an architecture called pseudoconversational which meant that the program serves requests from the terminal and then shuts down. Sound familiar? It is an “old-fashioned” REST architecture. Granted the responses provided are much more limited in CICS than in REST. But CICS was created more than 50 years ago and was revolutionary in how many people it allowed a single mainframe to support.

Open Source

Open source is a great thing; it impacts so many areas of programing and computer use. Open source has been around for decades though. CICS, the forementioned IBM product started life as an Open Source program. What has changed with open source? It is the Internet making Open Source programs and utilities readily available and making it just as easy to contribute.

Programming Languages

Tons of new programming language have come on the scene. Many new capabilities have arrived with them. When I started, procedural programming languages were about it. There was some variation, but the capabilities and the way things were accomplished were pretty much the same in most languages.

Now, we still have some procedural languages though their role is much smaller. Additionally, we have object-oriented languages, functional languages, dynamic languages, and more.

This is the area that I feel has improved the most since I started programming. The improvements in encapsulation and abstraction are nothing short of fantastic allowing us to build more complex systems without making the coding becoming more complex. In fact, in many ways, I believe systems today can be simpler to understand than equivalent systems from 20 years ago because of the extensive encapsulation and abstraction support in modern development languages.

In Conclusion

Being a computer programmer today is vastly different than it was when I graduated college. I wonder how different it will be when I look back in another 20 years? Will we be looking back on the quaint days of object-oriented and functional languages the way I’m looking back at procedural languages today?