>Shutting Things Down

>This isn’t a post about technology or about development; it is about the emotional toll getting laid off can take. As you can probably guess, I’m getting laid off a the end of December. Having been lucky enough to have gotten through more than 20 years without being laid off, I’m surprised how much this is weighing on me emotionally.

In addition to the lay offs, the company is transitioning to what I’d describe as a holding company at the same time. As of January 1, it will no longer have any staff or conduct any business. From an IT perspective, this means turning off all IT services and systems at the end of the month.

I have known this change was coming for a few months now. I thought that know would make dealing with this easier. I was wrong. When I’m up late at night, I start thinking about all of the work we did over the past eight years and how it must have no value. After all, if it had value, wouldn’t it be kept?

I do know this isn’t the case. The work we did provided tremendous value. It allowed us to compete with much larger players and let us force some positive changes in our industry. That’s something we need to be proud of.

I also know that the decision to shut down operations and lay off all staff was not a personal one. The company is changing because it had to. We were at a point where competing was more difficult and more expensive. Something had to change.

A while back, I read (sorry, I’m paraphrasing because I can’t find the source for this quote – if you know the source, please let me know):

Behind every business decision that forces personnel changes are people feeling the personal impacts of that decision.

In other words, the fact that I am losing my job makes the business decision personal to me. In an odd way, this makes me feel better; it validates what I’m feeling and makes me believe what I’m feeling is normal.

I know I will get through this and will come out the other side a stronger and better person. But it is not a fun road to go through.

>User Interfaces Are Complicated

>I’ve been doing some work on a food diary site of mine. One of the items I capture is the time food was eaten. I never thought capturing time in a user interface was so difficult until I started to work it.

My first step was to figure out what I needed to capture. I decided I didn’t need an exact time; rather, an approximate time would be good enough (within a 15 or 30 minute window). I looked for a jQuery plug-in to do this. I found some that used drop downs to capture hours, minutes and seconds. I found some that used spinners. I didn’t like any of those.

I found a couple that provide a type of drop-down (more like an auto-complete than a true drop-down) and I liked that approach. But none of them were quite what I was looking for so I spun my own. So far, it’s okay but I still need to do some tweaking on it.

I decided to make a mobile web version of the site. After doing some research, I decided to create the mobile version using jQuery mobile. It’s feature set is pretty cool and it seems rather stable even though it is only an alpha release.

Then I got to time entry. For my control, I display a scrollable Div below a textbox so that time can be typed in or selected. When my scrollable Div displays in phone browsers, it displays but it doesn’t scroll. Plus, given the assumptions I made about data entry, the approach really doesn’t work for phone/touch based browsers. For example, when you hit tab or click on the next field, the scrollable Div autohides. But, who clicks tab on a phone? And because of the window size, it’s hard to click on the next textbox. So the approach that works decently on a computer browser, really doesn’t fit the mobile browser.

For now, I pulled back on the mobile version of my site. While jQuery Mobile is really slick, there are a few too many things missing. Though I did decide that, when I’m ready, I’ll do the date and time with spinners like Android does it natively (separate text boxes for each entry item with the up and down arrows above and below the text box respectively.

It’s amazing how complicated a single user interface element can become.